Compliance With Civil Protective Orders in the Social Media Age

In the District of Columbia Civil Protective Orders (CPO’s) are available to 35755505 - social engagement
individuals who have had a crime committed against them, or have had a crime threatened against them, by someone with whom they have had certain types of previous relationships. A standard CPO will include a provision that the person to whom the protective order is enforceable against cannot contact the protected person either directly or indirectly and can also restrict social media and electronic contact.

For the most part this seems straightforward enough, but social media accounts can create many pitfalls. For instance what about tagging someone who is protected by a CPO? The answer may surprise you. Another area of concern is how courts will treat protected parties who receive “notifications” from the social media company (e.g. Facebook, Instagram) about actions by the other party? To avoid any potential liability the best course of action may be to delete your accounts, or short of that block the other person so as to not risk any violations. Before blocking the other person you should check with the social media company that the person being blocked will not receive any sort of notification of being blocked. Contempt of a CPO can lead to civil and criminal penalties with fines up to $1,000 and possible jail time so its best to do everything to make sure compliance is assured.

How Is Child Custody Determined in the District of Columbia?

One frequently asked question from clients is how do the courts decide who gets custody? In the District of Columbia judges use a number of statutory factors to consider what is in the “best interest of the child”. The factors the judges consider are:

  • the wishes of the child where practicable;
  • the wishes of the child’s parent or parents as to the child’s custody;
  • the interaction and interrelationship of the child with his or her parent or parents, his or her siblings, and
  • any other person who may emotionally or psychologically affect the child’s best interest;
  • the child’s adjustment to his or her home, school, and community;
  • the mental and physical health of all individuals involved;
  • evidence of an intrafamily offense;
  • the capacity of the parents to communicate and reach shared decisions affecting the child’s welfare;
  • the willingness of the parents to share custody;
  • the prior involvement of each parent in the child’s life;
  • the potential disruption of the child’s social and school life;
  • the geographic proximity of the parental homes as this relates to the practical considerations of the child’s
  • residential schedule;
  • the demands of parental employment;
  • the age and number of children;
  • the sincerity of each parent’s request;
  • the parent’s ability to financially support a joint custody arrangement;
  • the benefit to the parents.

Schedule a consultation with the Barkat Law Firm now by calling us at (202) 827-9776 or emailing info@barkatlaw.com to speak with a child custody attorney on how to protect you and your child’s interest in a child custody proceeding.

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